This mass of rock plunged from an altitude of approximately 3000 feet (914 meters) down into the waters of Gilbert Inlet (see map below). This tsunami is analogous to the tallest ever recorded tsunami, which hit Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958.

It also caused a rockfall in Lituya Bay that generated a wave with a maximum height of 1,720 feet – the world’s largest recorded tsunami. A full-grown Alaskan brown bear on the rocky slope looked the size of a mite. PortandTerminal.com, February 2, 2020 “Lituya Bay is a paradise always poised on the edge of violence,” HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA – On July 9, 1958, a magnitude 7.9 earthquake sent 40 million cubic yards of dirt and glacier from a mountainside at the head of Lituya Bay on the southern coast of Alaska tumbling into the bay..

Miraculously, only two people died. People shake their heads when I tell them I saw it that night. CONTRIBUTIONS TO GENERAL GEOLOGY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROFESSIONAL PAPER 354-C A timely account of the nature and possible causes of certain giant waves, with eyewitness reports of their destructive capacity UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFIC.E, WA:SHIN:GTON : 1960 On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle loosened about 40 million cubic yards (30.6 million cubic meters) of rock high above the northeastern shore of Lituya Bay. A megatsunami is defined as a wave reaching more than 100 meters (328 feet) in the deep ocean. Megatsunami is meant to refer to a tsunami with an initial wave amplitude (wave height) measured in several tens, hundreds, or possibly thousands of meters. As the Lituya bay is located on the fair-weather fault, it is prone to earthquakes and in 1958 it was struck by an earthquake measuring 9 on the Richter scale. On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle loosened about 40 million cubic yards (30.6 million cubic meters) of rock high above the northeastern shore of Lituya Bay. Photo by D.J. Map information from Seismicity of the United States, 1568-1989 (Revised), by Carl W. Stover and Jerry L. Coffman, U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1527, United States Government Printing Office, Washington: 1993. A tsunami with a record run-up height of 1720 feet occurred in Lituya Bay, Alaska. History and science books consider it to be the largest tsunami of modern times. At 10:15 pm on July 10, 1958, the ground shook violently as an M7.8 earthquake occurred along the Fairweather Fault in Southeast Alaska. The rockfall of July 9, 1958 occurred on steep cliffs above the northeast shore of Gilbert Don J. Miller (1960), "Giant Waves at Lituya Bay, Alaska" Don Tocher (1960), "The Alaska Earthquake of July 10, 1958: Movement on the Fairweather Fault and Field Investigation of Southern Epicentral Region" Steven N. Ward and Simon Day (2010), "The 1958 Lituya Bay Landslide and Tsunami - A Tsunami Ball Approach" Megatsunamis are incredibly rare and only occur when a cataclysmic event - such as an asteroid impact or a massive underwater landslide - strikes in an open ocean area. On July 9, 1958, an earthquake with an estimated magnitude of 7.7-8.3 triggered an enormous rockfall in a remote bay along the Gulf of Alaska. Giant Waves in Lituya Bay Alaska By DON J. MILLER SHORTER. The highest wave ever recorded occurred on July 9, 1958 in Lituya Bay, Alaska reaching a height of 524 meters (1,720 feet), 470 feet taller than the Empire State Building. All of these waves were significant in size, but shoreline evidence for all of them was removed by the 1958 wave. light to sound live performance. This mega-tsunami was triggered by a strong 8.3 earthquake at the Fairweather Fault , which resulted in a huge landslide that fell into the narrow inlet of Lituya Bay. Miller, United States Geological Survey. A megatsunami is defined as a wave reaching more than 100 meters (328 feet) in the deep ocean. The tsunami was triggered by an 8.3 magnitude earthquake, triggering … This is the talk page for discussing improvements to the 1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska earthquake and megatsunami article. On July 10, 1958, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake occurred on the Fairweather Fault in southeast Alaska. The areas of destroyed forest along the shorelines are clearly recognizable as the light areas rimming the bay. On this date, in Lituya Bay, Alaska, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault triggered a landslide of some 40 million cubic yards with some 90 million cubic tons of debris. The glacier had risen in the air and moved forward so it was in sight. He had documented evidence for at least four previous large waves with estimated dates of 1936, 1899, 1874, and 1853 (or 1854). 1936: Lituya Bay, Alaska. It caused significant geologic changes in the region, including areas that experienced uplift and subsidence. With such a history of large waves, Lituya Bay should be considered as a dangerous body of water prone to a few large waves every century. Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube. The latest and largest of these waves washed out trees to a maximum altitude of 1,720 feet, more than 8 times the maximum recorded height of a tsunami breaking on an ocean shore (Leet, 1948, p. 179). The earthquake, measured at 7.9 on the M w scale, was approximately 280 kilometres southeast of Kodiak and happened at a depth of 25 kilometres. Biggest tsunami ever recorded was in Lituya Bay, Alaska, it’s height – astonishing 524 meters (1724 ft.) On July 9, 1958, an earthquake of magnitude 7.7 (on the Richter scale), caused 90 million tonnes of rock and ice to drop into the deep water at the head of Lituya Bay. The wave hit with such power that it swept completely over the spur of land that separates Gilbert Inlet from the main body of Lituya Bay. The isoseismal contours near the epicenter parallel the Fairweather Fault. On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in Alaska loosened about 40 million cubic yards of rock about 3,000 feet above the northeastern shore of Lituya Bay. The giant wave runup of 1,720 feet (524 m.) at the head of the Bay and the subsequent huge wave along the main body of Lituya Bay which occurred on July 9, 1958, were caused primarily by an enormous subaerial rockfall into Gilbert Inlet at the head of Lituya Bay, triggered by dynamic earthquake ground motions along the Fairweather Fault. Accessed November 20, 2020. Obviously, megatsunamis will happen again, and possibly without warning. Map redrawn from data included in United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 354-C. About five megatsunamis are believed to have taken place in Alaska's Lituya Bay. The head of the slide was at an altitude of about 3,000 feet (914 meters), just below snowfield in upper center. The impact of 40 million cubic yards (30.6 million cubic meters) of rock hitting the water produced a local tsunami that swept the entire length of the Lituya Bay and over the La Chaussee Spit. Tree trunks can be seen in the water and tree stumps along the lower shoreline. Accessed November 20, 2020. 2018 Gulf of Alaska earthquake On January 23, 2018, at 00:31 AKST, an earthquake occurred in the Gulf of Alaska near Kodiak Island. This caused a massive wave, reaching in some points to a height of 1,720 feet. This damaged area is shown in yellow on the map above. Scar at the head of Lituya Bay and wave damage on the north shore, from southwest of … Main article: 1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska earthquake and megatsunami Spruce tree shattered by the force of the water. Miller, United States Geological Survey. After scrutinizing the bay’s geology and history for years, one scientist calculated giant waves happen there once every quarter century—a 1 in 9000 chance on any given day. This mass of rock plunged from an altitude of approximately 3000 feet (914 meters) down into the waters of Gilbert Inlet (see map below). Miller, United States Geological Survey. A fishing boat anchored in the cove at lower left was carried over the spit in the foreground; a boat under way near the entrance was sunk; and a third boat, anchored near the lower right, rode out the wave. I don’t mean it was just hanging in the air. The Fairweather Fault trends across the northeast end of the Bay and is responsible for The effect of the tsunami still visible in 2010. – 10. Mr. Miller was in Alaska when the July 1958 wave occurred and flew to Lituya Bay the following day. 221 likes. It also caused a rockfall in Lituya Bay that generated a wave with a maximum height of 1,720 feet – the world’s largest recorded tsunami. The spur of land between Gilbert Inlet and Lituya Bay that received the full force of the wave. Photo by D.J. The wave then continued down the entire length of Lituya Bay, over La Chaussee Spit and into the Gulf of Alaska. It came after a powerful earthquake that measured 8.2 on the Richter scale triggerered a landslide of 30 million cubic meters of rock in the bay's inlet. Stump of living spruce tree broken off by the giant wave at Harbor Point, mouth of Lituya Bay. the T-shape of the bay. On July 9, 1958, an earthquake caused a landslide in the Gilbert Inlet at the head of the bay, generating a massive megatsunami which had sufficient energy to run up the hill slope just opposite of the landslide to a height measuring 1,722 feet (525 m), taller than the Empire State Building and snap off all the trees. He took the photographs shown above in July and August and documented the older waves in United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 354-C, Giant Waves in Lituya Bay, Alaska, 1960. The numbers are elevations (in feet) of the upper edge of the wave damage area and represent the approximate elevation of the wave as it traveled through the bay. The 1853-54 wave was estimated at 395 feet, the 1874 wave at 80 feet, the 1899 wave at 200 feet, the 1936 wave at 490 feet and the 1958 behemoth swept trees off a hillside at more than 1,720 feet. On July 9, 1958, an earthquake (7.9 to 8.3 on the Richter scale) struck Alaska, shaking off a 90 million (long) ton block of rock and ice into Lituya Bay in … Lituya Bay has a history of megatsunami events, but the 1958 event was the first for which sufficient data was captured at the time. Photo looking down the Fairweather Fault Trench at the head of Lituya Bay. This wave stripped all vegetation and soil from along the edges of the bay. ... 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami → 1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska earthquake and megatsunami. Photo by D.J. The force of the wave removed all trees and vegetation from elevations as high as 1720 feet (524 meters) above sea level. Wave damage areas along the shorelines of Lituya Bay, viewed from the south. The largest tsunami ever recorded on Earth occurred on July 9, 1958. Perhaps the most famous occurred on July 9, 1958, in Lituya Bay on Alaska’s southeast coast, when a nearby earthquake caused 40 million cubic yards of rock to slide 2,000 feet into the narrow bay. The biggest wave ever recorded by humans was documented on July 9, 1958, in Lituya Bay, on the southeast of Alaska, when an earthquake triggered a series of events that resulted in a megatsunami. La Palma is currently the most volcanically.. Megatsunami. But a record-breaking tsunami of a different sort occurred in 1958, in a remote part of Alaska known as Lituya Bay — and was witnessed by only six people, two of whom died. A third boat was in Lituya Bay at the time of the tsunami. The largest tsunami ever recorded on Earth occurred on July 9, 1958. Miller, United States Geological Survey. A 2010 model examined the amount of infill on the floor of the bay, which was many times larger than that of the rockfall alone, and also the energy and height of the waves. 1958 Lituya Bay Tsunami Description. On July 9, 1958… Its super wave reached 1720 feet (524 meters) and destroyed parts of Lituya Bay in Southeast Alaska. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1958_Lituya_Bay_megatsunami.

It also caused a rockfall in Lituya Bay that generated a wave with a maximum height of 1,720 feet – the world’s largest recorded tsunami. This location is seven miles (11.3 kilometers) away from where the wave originated. The most recent one is the 1958 Lituya Bay Megatsunami. ... crashed into the cliff and swept away the forest leaving only bare rock to a “splash” height of 1700.’ Photo by D.J. Brim of hat is 12 inches in diameter. Differently-aged vegetation is visible on the ridge separating Lituya Glacier from the main part of the bay – looking north from the head of the bay, Lituya Glacier to the right. On July 10, 1958, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake occurred on the Fairweather Fault in southeast Alaska. Inlet. The front of Lituya Glacier is visible in the lower left corner. The impact force of the rockfall generated a local tsunami that crashed against the southwest shoreline of Gilbert Inlet. On July 9, 1958, an earthquake with an estimated magnitude of 7.7-8.3 triggered an enormous rockfall in a remote bay along the Gulf of Alaska. Trees and soil were stripped away to an elevation of 1720 feet (524 meters) above the surface of Lituya Bay. The seven miles long and two miles narrow Lituya … This tree is located about seven miles (11.3 kilometers) from where the wave originated. There's one recorded eyewitness account that was made by Bill and Vivian Swanson who were onboard their fishing boat when the earthquake struck: With the first jolt, I tumbled out of the bunk and looked toward the head of the bay where all the noise was coming from. The elevation of water in Lituya Bay is sea level. The red arrow shows the location of the landslide, and the yellow arrow shows the location of the high point of the wave sweeping over the headland. The earthquake, measured at 7.9 on the M w scale, was approximately 280 kilometres southeast of Kodiak and happened at a depth of 25 kilometres. My ship seemed very small there beneath the steep walls of ice and stone. It must have risen several hundred feet. Big chunks of ice were falling off the face of it and down into the water. The wave started for us right after that and I was too busy to tell what else was happening up there. Lituya Bay is an ice-scoured tidal inlet on the northeast shore of the Gulf There were three fishing boats anchored near the entrance of Lituya Bay on the day the giant wave … The cliff where the rockslide originated is on the right side of Gilbert Inlet. History and science books consider it to be the largest tsunami of modern times. It was anchored near the mouth of the bay and was sunk by the big wave. While the average tsunami can generate wave heights of around 30 or event 50 feet, megatsunamis are on A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT SCALE! Prior to the July, 1958 tsunami, Don J. Miller of the United States Geological Survey had been studying evidence for the occurrence of large waves in Lituya Bay. They came off the glacier like a big load of rocks spilling out of a dump truck. The 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami occurred on July 9 at 10:15:58 p.m., following an earthquake with a moment magnitude of 7.8 and a maximum Mercalli Intensity of XI (Extreme) On July 9, 1958, an earthquake with a magnitude of 8.3 on the Richter scale rocked a small inlet in Alaska called Lituya Bay. There are no known survivors from this boat, and it was believed that there were two people on board. The biggest wave ever recorded by humans was documented on July 9, 1958, in Lituya Bay, on the southeast of Alaska, when an earthquake triggered a series of events that resulted in a megatsunami. – 12. Its super wave reached 1720 feet (524 meters) and destroyed parts of Lituya Bay in Southeast Alaska. Photo by D.J. Acombination of disturbances triggered by the earthquake generated a mega-tsunami wave that rose to a maximum height of 1,720 feet (516 This massive tremor triggered around 30.6 million cubic meters of rock to fall 3,000 feet into the Lituya Glacier, causing a torrent of displaced water to rear up and form a monstrous wave which, miraculously, only killed five people. depth of about 720 feet (219 meters), but a sill of only 32 feet (9.7 meters) in depth separates it from the Gulf of Alaska between La Chaussee Spit and Harbor Point. The mountains were shaking something awful, with slide of rock and snow, but what I noticed mostly was the glacier, the north glacier, the one they call Lituya Glacier. Miller, United States Geological Survey. The same topography that leads to the heavy tidal currents also created the tsunami with the highest runup against a hillside in recorded history. Wave damage on the south shore of Lituya Bay, from Harbor Point to La Chaussee Spit, southwest of Crillon Inlet. I know the glacier is hidden by the point when you’re in Anchorage Cove, but I know what I saw that night, too. At the head of Lituya Bay, Alaska, on July 10, 1958, an earthquake of magnitude 7.3 triggered a gigantic rock fall, later estimated as measuring forty million cubic yards, at the headland of the bay and a resultant 1,700-foot-high tsunami wave because of the water that was displaced. The Lituya Glacier and North Crillon Glacier have scoured portions of the Fairweather Trench in the area of Lituya Bay. Obviously, megatsunamis will happen again, and possibly without warning. They are the light green areas of different vegetation color around the rim of the bay. Gilbert Inlet and Crillon Inlet occupy the Fairweather Trench on the northeast end of Lituya Bay. When will the next one occur. Megatsunami yleisyys 1958 Lituya Bay Megatsunami Simulation (Short) - YouTub . ... 1720 ft is the maximum height of water damage due to the wash. It has a maximum On July 9, 1958, an earthquake (7.9 to 8.3 on the Richter scale) struck Alaska, shaking off a 90 million (long) ton block of rock and ice into Lituya Bay in southern Alaska, … Photo by D.J. However, that was dwarfed by a megatsunami that struck Lituya Bay, Alaska, on July 10, 1954, which annihilated vegetation up to 1,720 feet (524 meters.) The Landslide Blog (2008, July 9) Lituya Bay—50 Years On. Lituya Bay, Alaska’s “Tsunami Alley ... but In 1958, a 7.7 earthquake shook the entire region and caused a huge slab of the mountain to fall into the T-shaped end of the inlet. The strong shaking set loose an enormous rockfall, in which 40 million cubic yards of material (9 Superdomes!) I know you can’t ordinarily see that glacier from where I was anchored. The front of Lituya Glacier with lateral and medial moraines is seen terminating in Gilbert Inlet. Areas where soil and vegetation were removed are still clearly visible. The area was sparsely inhabited, but there were reportedly 5 casualties who were onboard a boat that was in the path of the megatsunami.. On the evening of July 9th, 1958 the largest tsunami ever observed occurred in Lituya Bay in Southeast Alaska. This is an isoseismal map showing the impact of the Magnitude 7.7 Alaska Earthquake of July 9, 1958 in Modified Mercalli Scale units. The chaos of deadly mother nature could be heard by locals more than 50 miles away. Find Lituya Bay in Google Earth and you'll see the marks today. It is about seven miles long (11.3 kilometers) and up to two miles wide (3.2 kilometers). It came after a powerful earthquake that measured 8.2 on the Richter scale triggerered a landslide of 30 million cubic meters of rock in the bay's inlet. The tallest wave in history was the 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami, reaching a height of 1,720 feet (524 meters). The wave damaged areas along the edges of the bay. On 9 July 1958, a giant landslide at the head of Lituya Bay in Alaska, caused by an earthquake, generated a wave with an initial amplitude of up to 520 metres (1,710 ft). The world's tallest tsunami - Lituya Bay, Alaska, 1958 Arctic & Northern History On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in Alaska loosened about 40 million cubic yards of rock about 3,000 feet above the northeastern shore of Lituya Bay. On July 9, 1958, an earthquake with a magnitude of 8.3 on the Richter scale rocked a small inlet in Alaska called Lituya Bay. 2018 Gulf of Alaska earthquake On January 23, 2018, at 00:31 AKST, an earthquake occurred in the Gulf of Alaska near Kodiak Island. On July 9, 1958, the largest wave in modern history occurred in Lituya Bay, on the northern Southeast Alaska coast about halfway between Cape Spencer and Yakutat. 1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska earthquake and megatsunami - Wikipedi . of Alaska. 1958 Lituya Bay Megatsunami. The cliff on the northeast wall of Gilbert Inlet showing the scar of the 40 million cubic yard (30.6 million cubic meters) rockslide that occurred on the day before this photo. Images of the powerful 2011 Japanese tsunami sweeping along the Japanese coast shocked the world as it engulfed entire towns and coastal areas, reaching heights of up to an astonishing 133 feet (40.5 meters), However, that was dwarfed by a megatsunami that struck Lituya Bay, Alaska, on July 10, 1954, which annihilated vegetation up to 1,720 feet (524 meters.). Miller, United States Geological Survey. Damage from the 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami can be seen in this oblique aerial photograph of Lituya Bay, Alaska as the lighter areas at the shore where trees have been stripped away. It seems to be solid, but it was jumping and shaking like crazy. tumbled down a steep slope into the narrow inlet of Lituya Bay. (+39) 0436 868615 Piazzetta San Francesco N°1 - 32043 Cortina d'Ampezzo (BL). On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle loosened about 40 million cubic yards (30.6 million cubic meters) of rock high above the northeastern shore of Lituya Bay. This is a Landsat Geocover image of Lituya Bay produced with Landsat data collected by NASA about forty years after the tsunami. The giant wave washed out trees to a maximum elevation of 1,720 feet (524 meters) at the entrance of Gilbert Inlet. Les dommages causés par la baie Lituya 1958 Mégatsunami peut être vu sur cette photographie aérienne oblique de la baie Lituya, en Alaska que les zones plus claires sur la rive où ont été dépouillés des arbres loin Biggest tsunami ever recorded was in Lituya Bay, Alaska, it’s height – astonishing 524 meters (1724 ft.) On July 9, 1958, an earthquake of magnitude 7.7 (on the Richter scale), caused 90 million tonnes of rock and ice to drop into the deep water at the head of Lituya Bay. University of Alaska (2018, July 13) Lituya Bay. It hit the water with such force that it generated a humongous wave known as a megatsunami. English: On 9 July 1958, a rockslide in w:Lituya Bay, Alaska, caused an enormous tsunami estimated at 1,720 feet ... 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami Earthquake that caused the largest megatsunami in recorded history. That was six miles away and they still looked like big chunks. Union de i Ladis de Anpezo – U.L.d'A. A 1,720 foot tsunami towered over Lituya Bay, a quiet fjord in Alaska, after an earthquake rumbled 13 miles away. On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle loosened about 40 million cubic yards (30.6 million cubic meters) of rock high above the northeastern shore of Lituya Bay. In 1958, a giant landslide at the head of Lituya Bay in Alaska, caused by an earthquake, generated a wave with an initial height of 1,719 feet. MODELING THE 1958 LITUYA BAY MEGA-TSUNAMI Charles L. Mader Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. ABSTRACT Lituya Bay, Alaska is a T-Shaped bay… On July 10, 1958, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake occurred on the Fairweather Fault in southeast Alaska. This landslide created a local tsunami that washed away pretty much everything - soil and vegetation including trees - from elevations as high as 1720 feet above sea level. A tsunami with a record run-up height of 1720 feet occurred in Lituya Bay, Alaska. This is the highest wave that has ever been known. The impact generated a local tsunami that crashed against the southwest shore… Lituya Bay a few weeks after the 1958 tsunami. The opposite valley wall on the left side of Gilbert Inlet received the full force of the big wave, stripping it of soil and trees. University of Alaska (2018, July 13) 60 Years Ago: The 1958 Earthquake and Lituya Bay Megatsunami.

Some of the megatsunamis experienced recently include the 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami and the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. Lituya Bay’s steep walls, the geometry of its seafloor, and the fact that it intersects a fault that is often a source of earthquakes suggests that Lituya Bay will see more tsunamis in the future.

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